04Oct

In a significant move towards promoting sustainable agriculture, carbon sequestration, and climate finance in West Africa, Coöperatieve Rabobank and the West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance (WAA) have joined hands in a strategic partnership. This partnership, rooted in shared values and objectives, seeks to enhance the livelihoods of farmers and smallholder producers while contributing to the global effort to combat climate change.

Coöperatieve Rabobank, headquartered in Amsterdam and with a place of business in Utrecht, is a well-established financial institution with a strong commitment to sustainable development. Rabobank’s presence and influence in the world of finance make it a vital player in the quest for sustainable solutions.

Founded during the Africa Carbon Forum in Cotonou in 2017, West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance (WAA) is a sub-regional alliance comprising West African countries, including all ECOWAS members plus Mauritania. WAA was born out of the collective vision of West African nations to actively participate in international carbon markets, technology transfer, and climate finance for the implementation of their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

The partnership between Rabobank and the West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance represents a significant step towards sustainable agriculture, carbon sequestration, and climate finance in West Africa. By focusing on the empowerment of smallholder farmers and the utilization of the Rabobank Acorn platform, this collaboration holds the potential to make a substantial impact on both the agricultural sector and climate change mitigation efforts in the region. As these two organizations work together, they bring expertise, resources, and a shared commitment to a more sustainable future for West Africa and the planet as a whole.

03Oct

The Abidjan Call for a West Africa Carbon Market Hub represents a significant milestone in the journey towards sustainable development and climate action in the West African sub-region. Held in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, from September 26 to 28, 2023, this gathering of stakeholders underscores the pivotal role of carbon markets in catalyzing finance for transformative changes across various development sectors. These changes, spanning energy, industry, transportation, waste, and agriculture, are essential for aligning with the objectives of the Paris Agreement, conserving biodiversity, reducing emissions, and enhancing the living standards of West African populations.

Abidjan Call_Final Version

29Jun

The recent climate change conference held in Bonn from June 5 to 15, 2023, provided a significant platform for global discussions on pressing environmental issues. The West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance actively participated in the conference, building on the mandates established during COP 27 in Egypt. With a strong focus on Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, the Alliance engaged in fruitful bilateral meetings with various partners and countries to further its mission. Let’s delve into the Alliance’s remarkable participation and its potential for driving sustainable change in the region.

Collaboration with UAE Independent Climate Change Accelerators:

During SB58, the UNFCCC secretariat facilitated a productive collaboration between the West African Alliance and the UAE Independent Climate Change Accelerators (UICCA). The two institutions met to exchange views and explore opportunities for joint initiatives. This partnership holds promise for fostering innovative climate finance mechanisms and carbon market development in the region, while leveraging the UAE’s expertise in sustainable practices.

 

Bilateral Meeting with Ghana: Advancing Article 6 Implementation:

The West African Alliance was thrilled to engage in a bilateral meeting with Ghana to discuss the implementation of Article 6 of the UNFCCC. The Alliance commended Ghana’s progress in developing a concept paperand enhancing private sector involvement in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) implementation, particularly through Article 6 market activities. This development aligns perfectly with the Alliance’s goals of empowering indigenous project developers and facilitating private sector participation in Article 6 initiatives within the sub-region.

 

Promising Outlook with Nigeria:

A pivotal moment occurred at SB58 when the West African Alliance conducted a bilateral meeting with the Nigerian delegation. This meeting provided an opportunity to understand Nigeria’s priorities and formulate strategies for supporting the implementation of Article 6. The Nigerian National Council on Climate Change expressed appreciation for the Alliance’s proactive actions in addressing climate change in Nigeria. This collaboration aims to position Nigeria and other member countries at the forefront of the carbon market, drawing valuable lessons from past experiences like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).

 

Shared Commitment and Vision:

The Alliance remains steadfast in its commitment to collaboration and cooperation with its partners. Salisu M. Dahiru, the Director General of the National Council on Climate Change, reiterated Nigeria’s strong commitment to work closely with the Alliance, expressing his confidence in exceeding expectations. The Alliance Coordinator, Ousmane Fall SARR, emphasized the collective effort to position Nigeria and member countries as leaders in the carbon market, drawing on the lessons learned from previous carbon credit mechanisms.

The West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance made a notable impact at SB58 in Bonn, leveraging its expertise and collaborative spirit to drive meaningful change. Through bilateral meetings, the Alliance engaged with Ghana and Nigeria, fostering a deeper understanding of their priorities and offering support in implementing Article 6. As the Alliance continues to forge partnerships and champion sustainable initiatives, it envisions a future where West African countries play a pivotal role in shaping global climate action and realizing a low-carbon economy.

A step towards the organisation of the first West African Conference on Carbon Markets

An important event aimed at encouraging private sector involvement in carbon markets in West Africa was a highlight of SB58, which took place in Bonn with the alliance’s various partners. Under the theme “Scaling up Public and Private Capacity to Deliver the Goals of the Paris Agreement,” this gathering will address the challenges and opportunities for carbon markets in the region, while focusing on knowledge sharing, feedback, and collaboration.

Scheduled to take place from September 26 to 28, 2023, in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, the event will serve as a platform for stakeholders to delve into the operationalization of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement and the current state of negotiations. Participants will have the opportunity to gain insights into the requirements and opportunities of Article 6 operationalization and discuss the general carbon market landscape in West Africa. The workshop is hosted by International Emissions Trading Association (IETA) – B-PMI West African Alliance on Carbon Markets and Climate Finance

07Oct

[Article 6 National Readiness]

The Alliance has begun the elaboration of its readiness support framework for its member countries.  Although more tailored and structured supports are intended for countries who fit the following categories; early movers, countries with advanced pilot actions and countries with CDM implementation experience; other Alliance member countries will have the opportunity of assessing generic capacity support. 

Participation into market-based and non-marked cooperative approaches of Article 6 requires a domestic framework that facilitates the approval and registration of mitigation activities. It also requires an authorisation process for international transfers.  This process needs expanded institutional capacities to enable Alliance member countries seize and leverage opportunities in the international carbon market.  While a few member countries have some measure of capacity, others lack the knowledge base for carbon markets approaches.  This can be explained by the limited implementation experiences with carbon mechanisms. The capacity gap created by Africa’s late entry into carbon markets diminished the need and opportunity, in some countries for the developing relevant frameworks that could support long-term carbon market engagement.  

In April, 2021, the Alliance concluded a scooping study aimed assessing the capacity and institutional needs of member countries in relation to Article 6 implementation readiness.  In close collaboration with technical partners (Climate Focus, Perspectives and AEE), the Alliance secretariat, hosted by ENDA undertook series of in-depth dialogues and questionnaire administration with country focal points to elicit responses on readiness capacity needs and potential next steps.  Information gathered from the thirteen (13) Alliance member countries reveals that broader and enhanced support are needed in supporting countries jump-start the implementation of Article 6.2.  The result of the study showed differences in the states of Article 6 preparedness.  

 

Already member countries are working to advance the integration of Article 6 into NDC processes with 14 of the 16 West African Alliance countries already considering the integration of Article 6 into their national NDC.  Regarding the development of national Article 6 policy, no member country has developed an Article 6 strategy as various groundwork including public consultations are ongoing.  For example, so far 46% consultations with public sector stakeholders have been held and 38,5% private sector stakeholders identified. 

Some Alliance countries now have dedicated technical committees for the implementation of Article 6. Others, such as those currently conceptualizing or already far engaged in voluntary carbon markets (VCMs) pilot initiatives have established technical and legal frameworks.  Ghana has already established its NDC monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) system, while seven (7) other countries are currently in the process of developing one. Advanced Article.6 pilot activities in the sub-region includes the sustainable waste management programme, the standardized crediting framework, and the domestic biogas digesters in Senegal as well as the national clean energy access programme in Ghana and the pilot programme on adaptation benefit mechanism in Côte d’Ivoire.

Based on the study outcomes, the Alliance is now developing a tailored support framework and a clear road map for incorporating Article 6.2 into NDC implementation.   In aligning with these priorities, the Alliance will conduct a series of workshops to exchange knowledge and provide technical support needed on topics relevant to Article 6 implementation. The establishment of feedback channels to facilitate knowledge exchange are also planned.  Other envisaged study implementation includes elaborating donor coordination. This is to facilitate identification of ITMO buying entities and matching African carbon markets with interested ITM buyers.

07Oct

“Better negotiation prospects for West Africa at SBs52 and CoP 26 as Heads of Delegation and Alliance focal points received enhanced capacity building from the Alliance.  

[Alliance Participation into international climate negociations] 

Amidst the challenges associated with virtual participation, the West African Alliance on Carbon Market and Climate Finance (WAA) provided technical support in order to facilitate the participation of the Alliance focal points to the informal and formal bilateral talks at the SBSTA 52.  Through informed briefings and knowledge support, the heads of thematic groups of the AGN group now have a well-informed position and are better prepared for the upcoming CoP 26.  This is a departure from previous CoPs (24 and 25) where West African delegates lacked the clarity and understanding of the principles of Article 6.

This year’s SBs 52 discussions were largely centered around sub-items 6.2, 6.4 and 6.8 of the Article 6. This was due to the controversial nature of some elements of Article 6, like the mandatory/voluntary and provision of finance for adaptation (share of proceeds), CDM transitioning as well as the operationalization of OMGE.  However, with the knowledge provided by the Alliance, the heads of thematic groups of the AGN were able to share understanding and arrive at a common position on these issues.

Realizing the value of preparatory capacity workshops, which was evident in the just concluded SBs 52; the Alliance hopes to continue to provide series of preparatory technical workshops to heads of delegation ahead of future UNFCCC CoP preparatory sessions.  These preparatory technical workshops had positive impacts on the quality of the arguments and contributions it facilitated consensus  among thematic heads on knotty issues. Besides being familiarized with the position of the AGN and the rationale behind each Article 6 sub-issue, the heads of delegation were also able to develop and elaborate a briefing paper intended to guide further pre-COP discussions.

The certainty that West Africa’s position on Article 6 will be clearly articulated at this year’s CoP 26 is high and can be positively attributed to the broad knowledge support provided by the Alliance. Some of these support measures included virtual briefings jointly organized by the East and West African Alliances and the setting up of other instant communication channels like WhatsApp (SB 52 WhatsApp group).  The flow of information has increased, and members now have better experiences with exchanging views and sharing information.  The Alliance is also promoting the use of specialized platforms where only the Alliance LDCs members can participate in order to enhance strategic talks bothering on the divergent positions between the AGN and LDCs groups. 

 

04Jun

International cooperation under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement (PA) on market and nonmarket-based activities can support countries in mobilizing resources for mitigation action that collectively helps reach nationally determined contributions (NDCs) and raise ambition therein. National capabilities, including ready-for-purpose institutional frameworks and adequate technical capacities, must be in place to achieve stepwise
Article 6 readiness starting from organizing a basic understanding of Article 6 to mobilizing the full potential of implementation of Article 6 activities.

12Mar

Ms. Asmau Djibril has recently been appointed as an alternate member of the CDM Board (Clean Development Mechanism).  In addition to her role as the head of Mitigation Division of Department of Climate Change in Nigeria, Mrs Djibrilis also the Alliance focal point and working group lead person on technology transfer of the West African Alliance. Indeed, the continuous and active involvement of Alliance focal point into the implementation of Alliance’s activities (climate negotiation sessions, webinars, etc.) had remarkably enhanced member’s visibility and engagement at national and international level.

Regarding the Doha amendment, Ms. Asmau Djibril facilitated an accelerated legislative endorsement process for the Doha amendment signature. By the closing business day of October 2nd 2020, Nigerian Government was able to submit the 144th ratification letter needed for the UNSG to allow Doha amendment to enter into force. This great accomplishment and commitment by the Nigerian government was acknowledged by Patricia Espinosa C. the Executive Secretary of UNFCCC, in the official  twitter account.

12Mar

Since its launch at the close of 2019, the Eastern African Alliance is working very closely with West African Alliance to develop a range of win-win regional partnerships.  Driven by common capacity challenges and interests in long-term Article 6 engagement, both Alliances are working together to strengthen cross exchange of ideas and capacity opportunities.

A permanent communication channel has been set up by the two Alliances for improving coordination and the facilitation of planned regional approaches.  One of such collaborative efforts is the setting up of virtual platforms for online trainings and exchanges.  With funding from the World Bank, the East and West Africa Alliance organized an online carbon pricing training.  The success of the online carbon training inspired a regional approach by both Alliances for further initiatives that could engender cross-regional benefits. Thus, the Alliances have organized several activities together in promoting opportunities for member countries.

The collaboration between the two Alliances has contributed to the initiation of activities including preparatory workshop series for Article 6 negotiations as well as coordination meetings set up to support formal and informal interactions during the SBs 52.  In addition to inspiring peer-to-peer learning, the strategic partnership between the West and East African Alliance has improved understanding and consensus on key issues of regional interest particularly among negotiating groups such as AGN, LDC, etc.

12Mar

The Alliance has begun the elaboration of its readiness support framework for its member countries.  Although more tailored and structured supports are intended for countries who fit the following categories; early movers, countries with advanced pilot actions and countries with CDM implementation experience; other Alliance member countries will have the opportunity of assessing generic capacity support.

Participation into market-based and non-marked cooperative approaches of Article 6 requires a domestic framework that facilitates the approval and registration of mitigation activities. It also requires an authorisation process for international transfers.  This process needs expanded institutional capacities to enable Alliance member countries seize and leverage opportunities in the international carbon market.  While a few member countries have some measure of capacity, others lack the knowledge base for carbon markets approaches.  This can be explained by the limited implementation experiences with carbon mechanisms. The capacity gap created by Africa’s late entry into carbon markets diminished the need and opportunity, in some countries for the developing relevant frameworks that could support long-term carbon market engagement.

In April, 2021, the Alliance concluded a scooping study aimed assessing the capacity and institutional needs of member countries in relation to Article 6 implementation readiness.  In close collaboration with technical partners (Climate Focus, Perspectives and AEE), the Alliance secretariat, hosted by ENDA undertook series of in-depth dialogues and questionnaire administration with country focal points to elicit responses on readiness capacity needs and potential next steps.  Information gathered from the thirteen (13) Alliance member countries reveals that broader and enhanced support are needed in supporting countries jump-start the implementation of Article 6.2.  The result of the study showed differences in the states of Article 6 preparedness.

Already member countries are working to advance the integration of Article 6 into NDC processes with 14 of the 16 West African Alliance countries already considering the integration of Article 6 into their national NDC.  Regarding the development of national Article 6 policy, no member country has developed an Article 6 strategy as various groundwork including public consultations are ongoing.  For example, so far 46% consultations with public sector stakeholders have been held and 38,5% private sector stakeholders identified.

Some Alliance countries now have dedicated technical committees for the implementation of Article 6. Others, such as those currently conceptualizing or already far engaged in voluntary carbon markets (VCMs) pilot initiatives have established technical and legal frameworks.  Ghana has already established its NDC monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) system, while seven (7) other countries are currently in the process of developing one. Advanced Article.6 pilot activities in the sub-region includes the sustainable waste management programme, the standardized crediting framework, and the domestic biogas digesters in Senegal as well as the national clean energy access programme in Ghana and the pilot programme on adaptation benefit mechanism in Côte d’Ivoire.

Based on the study outcomes, the Alliance is now developing a tailored support framework and a clear road map for incorporating Article 6.2 into NDC implementation.   In aligning with these priorities, the Alliance will conduct a series of workshops to exchange knowledge and provide technical support needed on topics relevant to Article 6 implementation. The establishment of feedback channels to facilitate knowledge exchange are also planned.  Other envisaged study implementation includes elaborating donor coordination. This is to facilitate identification of ITMO buying entities and matching African carbon markets with interested ITM buyers.

12Mar

Amidst the challenges associated with virtual participation, the West African Alliance on Carbon Market and Climate Finance (WAA) provided technical support in order to facilitate the participation of the Alliance focal points to the informal and formal bilateral talks at the SBSTA 52.  Through informed briefings and knowledge support, the heads of thematic groups of the AGN group now have a well-informed position and are better prepared for the upcoming CoP 26.  This is a departure from previous CoPs (24 and 25) where West African delegates lacked the clarity and understanding of the principles of Article 6.

This year’s SBs 52 discussions were largely centered around sub-items 6.2, 6.4 and 6.8 of the Article 6. This was due to the controversial nature of some elements of Article 6, like the mandatory/voluntary and provision of finance for adaptation (share of proceeds), CDM transitioning as well as the operationalization of OMGE.  However, with the knowledge provided by the Alliance, the heads of thematic groups of the AGN were able to share understanding and arrive at a common position on these issues.

Realizing the value of preparatory capacity workshops, which was evident in the just concluded SBs 52; the Alliance hopes to continue to provide series of preparatory technical workshops to heads of delegation ahead of future UNFCCC CoP preparatory sessions.  These preparatory technical workshops had positive impacts on the quality of the arguments and contributions it facilitated consensus  among thematic heads on knotty issues. Besides being familiarized with the position of the AGN and the rationale behind each Article 6 sub-issue, the heads of delegation were also able to develop and elaborate a briefing paper intended to guide further pre-COP discussions.

The certainty that West Africa’s position on Article 6 will be clearly articulated at this year’s CoP 26 is high and can be positively attributed to the broad knowledge support provided by the Alliance. Some of these support measures included virtual briefings jointly organized by the East and West African Alliances and the setting up of other instant communication channels like WhatsApp (SB 52 WhatsApp group).  The flow of information has increased, and members now have better experiences with exchanging views and sharing information.  The Alliance is also promoting the use of specialized platforms where only the Alliance LDCs members can participate in order to enhance strategic talks bothering on the divergent positions between the AGN and LDCs groups.